BREAKING

Saturday, July 22, 2017

Nepal Travel Guide: Annapurna Round Trekking / Annapurna Circuit Trekking

This popular trek offers you an experience walking in Annapurna classic route. You can explore the culture of  multi-ethnic  groups, local villages with typical houses, locally cultivated terrain farms, water falls, moraine glaciers, ice lakes, wide varieties of flora and fauna etc. 

You can enjoy with the  excellent views of Annapurna panoramic Himalayan range including Tilicho peak,Gangapurna peak, Pisang peak, Tilicho Peak, Thorong peak, Yakwakang peak, Chulu East, Chulu West, Chulu Centre, and Himlung Himal. 

Also Manaslu range, Dhaulagiri peak, Nilgiri peak, Tukuche peak etc. Challenging and massive Thorang La pass (5416m) is the main attraction of this trek. It is known as world's the best pass for the trekkers.

Trip Summery
Trip Title: Annapurna Round Trekking/ Annapurna Circuit Trekking
Maximum Elevation: 5416m.
Walking Level: 5-7 hours per day.
Trekking Duration: 21 Days
Mode of Operation: Tea House Lodge Trekking
Best Season: Mar, Apr, May & Sept, Oct, Nov.
Trip Grade: Moderate and Strenuous
Group Size: Minimum: 2 people to Maximum: 18 people

Outline Itinerary: Annapurna Round Trekking / Annapurna Circuit Trekking
Day 01. Arrival in Kathmandu international airport 1300m, welcome by ART member  and transfer to hotel 2 star in Thamel touristic city. Bed and breakfast included.

Day 02. Drive from Kathmandu  to Bhulbhule 840m 6 hours by tourist bus. Overnight at Tea house Lodge.

Day 03. Trek Bhulbhule – Syange 1100m, 6 hours.Trek passes through green terraces, along the Marshyangdi river side. Overnight at Tea house Lodge.

Day 04. Trek Syange – Tal 1700m 5 hours.This day we follow river side climb in mountain path reaching Chyamche. We can view of magnificent waterfall and mini hydro power.Overnight at Tea house Lodge.

Day 05. Trek Tal – Bagarchhap 2160m 6 hours. This day we cross decent view of Manaslu range and we can over look the view of Dudh Khola River and Marshyangdi River. Annapurna II 7900m becomes visible ahead. Overnight at Tea house Lodge.

Day 06. Trek Bagarchhap – Chame 2670m 5 hours.Trek pass through thundering waterfall and Marshyangdi Khola becomes a George.Now, we can over look the magnificent Manaslu peak and Phungi Himal peak. We cross through the Gurung ethnic village and climb through a pine forest to Chame. Overnight at Tea house Lodge.

Day 07. Trek Chame – Pisang 3200m 5 hours.This day, we reach at the small settlement of Taleku.When we cross Buradhan on the right bank there are military station who fought against the Khampa tribal revolution. We can see the east peak of Annapurna II 7900m and Pisang peak 6100m. Overnight at Tea house Lodge.

Day 08. Trek Pisang – Manang 3540m 7 hours.There are two options to reach at Manang through climbing upper Gyaru village and Ngawal village. This day is special view of Annapurna II, Annapurna III, Annapurna IV, Gangapurna peak,Tilicho peak with large Buddhist Chortens (stupas),Buddhist Mani and Monasteries during the trail. Overnight at Tea house Lodge.

Day 09. Manang acclimatization. Manang is a surprisingly a large village for this remote mountain region. It's all houses are line up with Buddhist colorful prayer flags. We explore the surroundings crossing Marshyangdi River to visit wonderful Himalayan Gangapurna Lake and hike up to Deurali. 

Approximately  4400m to see the magnificent views of Chulu west peak,Chulu centre peak,Chulu East peak,Chulu Far east peak, Pisang peak, Annapurna II, Annapurna III, Annapurna IV, Gangapurna peak, Tilicho peak, etc. 5 hours Overnight at Tea house Lodge.

Day 10. Trek Manang – Ledar 4200m 5 hours.Our path this day is full of ups and down as the elevation gradually rises, after crossing Kenzan  Khola path towards to Ledar. Overnight at Tea house Lodge.

Day 11. Trek Ledar – Thorong High Camp 4925m 5 hours. This day, we cross difficult first part. We cross high wind, steep hill through rocky area frozen stream. This day we can see wild blue sheeps. Overnight at Tea house Lodge.

Day 12. Trek Thorong High Camp – Muktinath 3760m via Thorong pass (5416 m) 8 hours. Better view of Kali Gandaki in U shaped valley.  Ahead,  we can see, Thorong peak, Yakwakang peak,  Dhaulagiri I, II and III. Now, we trek in gentle slope with steep cliff through sacred land of Muktinath. We visit Buddhist and Hindu temples in same spot. Overnight at Tea house Lodge

Day 13. Trek Muktinath – Marpha 2670m 6 hours. Descend from Muktinath visit to Jharkot Buddhist monastery in  this ancient village and another sacred village Kagbeni  visit Buddhist monastery where Upper Mustang trek begins. 

Trek path down below close view of Kali Gandaki and reach famous airfield Jomsom and heading toward Marpha village. This place is very popular for its apple and homemade apple brandy. Overnight at Tea house Lodge.

Day 14. Trek Marpha – Kalopani 2530m 5 hours.Trek towards a stream of Tukuche Village. This day we have clear view of Nilgiri peak, Dhaulagiri I, Tukche peak, Annapurna I and Dhaulagiri Icefall. Overnight at Tea house Lodge.

Day 15. Trek Kalopani – Tatopani 1190m 5 hours .We cross through pine tree valley with suspension bridge, known as the  deepest gorge in the world between Dhaulagiri I and Annapurna I, a great water fall of Rupche Chahar. We can relax in natural hot spring shower in Tatopani. Overnight at Tea house Lodge.

Day 16. Trek Tatopani – Ghorepani 2860m 7 hours. We walk through local Magar ethnic villages and picturesque Rhododendron forest to reach at Ghorepani village. Overnight at Tea house Lodge.

Day 17. Trek Ghorepani – Tadapani 2630m 5 hours walk. Morning excursion 45 minutes walk up to Poon Hill 3200m for panoramic view of Dhaulagiri Himalayan range and Annapurna Himalayan range. 

After having breakfast, we descend down through the dense forest of different species of rhododendron and reach at Tadapani. Over night at Tea House Lodge.

Day 18. Trek Tadapani – Ghandruk 1940m 5 hours.Early morning, we walk in the dense forest and arrive at Ghandruk. After having lunch, we visit two Gurung ethnic museums and a Buddhist monastery. Approach views of South Annapurna,Himchuli peak,Fish Tail, Gangapurna peak, Gandharba chuli etc. Overnight at Tea House Lodge.

Day 19. Trek Ghandruk- Birethati 1025m 4 hours,  then Nayapul- Pokhara 900m 3 hours by tourist bus. Bed & Breakfast at Mount Kailash Resort.This day,we walk down to Birethati through terrain local farms and follow the Modi Khola river to arrive in Birethati. 

After having lunch in Birethati, we walk about 30 minutes to reach at Nayapul.Then, we go to Pokhara. Overnight at comfort hotel near Fewa Lake in Pokhara. Bed and breakfast included.

Day 20. Drive from Pokhara to Kathmandu 6 hours by tourist bus and transfer to  hotel 2 star with bed and breakfast included.

Day 21. International  departure

Trip Cost Per Person:
1400$ (2-4 pax)  1350 $ (5-8 pax) 1300 $ (9-12 pax)
1250 $ (13-16 Pax) 1200 $ (17-20 Pax)

COST INCLUDES:
-Airport-hotel transfers by private car or tourist mini bus according to group size.
-2 nights 2 star level Hotel in Kathmandu at Thamel touristic city with breakfast except lunch and dinner.
-Trekking permits of Annapurna Conservation Area Project  and TIMS (Trekkers Information Management System).
-Accommodation in tea house lodge twin basis.
-Food(breakfast,lunch & dinner) with hot drinks during the trek.
-Salary, insurance, transport, food and accommodation for guide and porters.
-Kathmandu to Bulbule by tourist bus, Nayapul to Pokhara by tourist bus, Pokhara to Kathmandu by  tourist bus or plane  as mentioned in above itinerary.
-13 % VAT compulsory tax of Nepal Government and other local taxes.
-An experienced & professional English speaking trekking guide, assistant guides  and porters.

COST EXCLUDES:
-Nepal visa fee 40 USD for a month. Nepal visa can be obtained at your country in Nepalese consulate office before arrival in Nepal or you can get Nepal visa after arrival in Kathmandu airport.
-International Airfare to and from Kathmandu.
-Extra night accommodation in Kathmandu because of early arrival, late departure, early return from mountain (due to any reason) than the scheduled itinerary.

-Lunch and dinner in Kathmandu & Pokhara city also in the case of early return from mountain than the scheduled itinerary.
-Travel, Trekking and Helicopter Rescue insurance.
-Cold and alcoholic drinks
-Personal high altitude medicines, first aid kits, equipment, gears, cloths etc.

-Personal expenses: phone calls, laundry, bar bills, battery recharge of camera or mobile and gas shower in mountain.
-Tips for guide and porters according to custom of trekking in Nepal since long though it is not obligation if your trip is not satisfied.

Our staffs composition for the trek
1 Main Guide = whole clients ( This main guide will accompany you during the trek start to end)
1 Assistant Guide = 7 clients ( This assistant guide will accompany sick clients if they get altitude sickness or any accident)
1 Porter = 2 clients ( 1 Porter carries two baggage of 2 clients 10kgx2=20kg, our clients carry only small day bag of 35 liter to put camera, water, polar jacket etc. )

Clothing & Equipment Check List:
Important documents and items
Valid passport, 2 extra passport size photos, airline tickets
Separate photocopies of passport, visa form (easily obtained at Kathmandu airport), proof of insurance

Dollars, pounds or Euros in cash for purchasing Nepalese visa at Kathmandu airport, for paying for restaurants and hotels, for gratuities, snacks, and to purchase your own drinks and gifts
Credit cards, Bank/ATM/Cash machine cards for withdrawing funds from cash machines (bring a photocopy of your cards), traveler's checks, etc.

Head
Bandana or head scarf, also useful for dusty conditions
Warm hat that covers your ears (wool or synthetic)
Headlamp with extra batteries and bulbs
Sunglasses with UV protection
Prescription sunglasses (if required)

Upper Body
Polypropylene shirts (1 half sleeve and 2 long sleeves)
Light and expedition weight thermal tops
Fleece wind-stopper jacket or pullover
Waterproof (preferably breathable fabric) shell jacket

Down vest and/or jacket -You can hire feather's down jacket in Kathmandu per day 100 NRS.
Gore-Tex jacket with hood, waterproof and breathable
Hands
1 pair of lightweight poly-liner gloves.
1 pair of lightweight wool or fleece gloves
1 pair of mittens, consists of 1 Gore-Tex over mitt matched with a very warm polar-fleece mitt liner (seasonal)
Lower Body

Non-cotton underwear briefs
1 pair of Hiking shorts
1 pair of Hiking trousers
1 pair of lightweight thermal bottoms (seasonal)
1 pair of fleece or woolen trousers
1 pair of waterproof shell pants, breathable fabric

Feet
2 pairs of thin, lightweight inner socks
2 pairs of heavy poly or wool socks
1 pair of Hiking boots with spare laces (sturdy soles, water resistant, ankle support, “broken in”)
1 pair of trainers or running shoes and/or sandals
Cotton socks (optional)
Gaiters (winter only), optional, “low” ankle high version
Sleeping

1 sleeping bag (- 15 degrees C) -You can hire in Kathmandu 200 NRS per day.
Fleece sleeping bag liner (optional)
Rucksack and Travel Bags
1 medium rucksack (50-70 liters/3000-4500 cubic inches, can be used for an airplane carry on)

1 large duffel bag *
A small day bag/backpack for carrying your valuables, should have good shoulder padding
Small padlocks for duffel-kit bags
2 large waterproof rucksack covers (optional)

Medical
Small, personal first-aid kit. (simple and light)
Aspirin, first-aid tape, and plasters (Band-Aids)
1 skin-blister repair kit
Anti-diarrhea pills
Anti-headache pills

Cough and/or cold medicine
Anti-altitude sickness pills: Diamox or Acetylzolamide
Stomach antibiotic: Ciprofloxacin, etc. Do not bring sleeping pills as they are a respiratory depressant.
Water purification tablets or water filter
1 set of earplugs
Extra pair of prescription glasses, contact lens supplies

Practical Items
1 small roll of repair tape, 1 sewing-repair kit
1 cigarette lighter, 1 small box of matches
1 compass or GPS(optional)
1 alarm clock/watch
1 digital camera with extra cards and batteries
large Zip lucks

2 water bottles (1 liter each)
1 small folding knife
Binoculars (optional)
4 large, waterproof, disposable rubbish sacks

Toiletries
1 medium-sized quick drying towel
Toothbrush/paste (preferably biodegradable)
Multi-purpose soap (preferably biodegradable)
Deodorants
Nail clippers
Face and body moisturizer
Female hygiene products
Small mirror

Personal Hygiene
Wet wipes (baby wipes)
Tissue /toilet roll
Anti-bacterial hand wash
Extras/Luxuries
Reading book
Trail map/guide book
Journal and pen
iPod

Travel game i.e. chess, backgammon, scrabble, playing cards (to help you pass the time at tea houses and/or camps)
1 modest swim suit
Binoculars (optional)
Voltage converter (from 220 to 110)
Plug adapter (2 round pegs to 2 flat pegs)
Lightweight pillow case (in case your tea houses provide you with pillows) or use your own stuff as a pillow


Terms & conditions

For the confirmation of your trip, our selling terms and conditions are as below. Please, read them carefully and book your trip with us. You may ask us bank information to send in your email or you can visit our "Payment Method" link in our web site where you can see all bank account information of our company. When we receive your transfer, we will send you the invoice/payment receipt bill in your email.
Booking Policy:
01. If you agree with our proposal, we request you to make an advance booking payment of 40 % of the total amount in our bank account. We will send you all necessary bank information or you can see all bank account information of our company in our web site for money transfer to Nepal. Please, remember that we do not bear any bank transfer fees and charge. You should pay yourself transfer charge in your country.

02. We are requested you to send us color scanning photocopies of your passport, your passport size photos and your travel insurance certificates with helicopter rescue coverage for ( trekking only not for cultural tour ) JPG or PDF files in our email address. We will print them and use for the formality of trek permits and other official uses.
03. We are requested to transfer the remaining 60 % of the amount of your trip in 30 days before your arrival in Kathmandu. This will allow us to prepare all the arrangements for camping trek such as to buy foods, fuel, equipment etc. If you booked us tea house lodge trek, you can pay us remaining 60 % of the amount after arrival in Kathmandu or you can transfer before 30 days of your arrival in Nepal as you wish.
Cancellation Policy:
01. In case of cancellation your travel project, you must inform us one month before your arrival in Kathmandu, we will not refund the 40 % advance payment or if you wish we can accept this amount to postpone your trip for the next season.


02. Our company Altitude Randonnée Trekking (P.) Ltd. is not responsible for any cancellations of domestic flights due to weather or climate problem. However, we can offer you an alternative solution or trekking routes to suit your desires according to your budget you paid us.
03. In case of accident, mountain sickness, physical problem and any other else if you abandon your trek and return to Kathmandu earlier date than mentioned in itinerary, you will not get any refund from the agency. Also, you should pay for your extra accommodation nights in hotel and meals in Kathmandu.
04. If you cancel the project in less than a month before your arrival in Nepal, we can’t refund you any amount you paid us. So, we request you to make insurance of your advance booking payment in your country.
So, this terms and condition are made between two parties: Altitude Randonnée Trekking (P.) Ltd. as first party and Clients/International agenciesas second party.
About Nepal
History of Nepal
Records mention the Gopalas and Mahishapalas believed to have been the earliest rulers with their capital at Matatirtha, the south-west corner of the Kathmandu Valley. From the 7th or 8th Century B.C. the Kirantis are said to have ruled the valley. Their famous King Yalumber is even mentioned in the epic, ‘Mahabharat’. 

Around 300 A.D. the Lichhavis arrived from northern India and overthrew the Kirantis. One of the legacies of the Lichhavis is the Changu Narayan Temple near Bhaktapur, a UNESCO World Heritage Site (Culture), which dates back to the 5th Century. 

In the early 7th Century, Amshuvarma, the first Thakuri king took over the throne from his father-in-law who was a Lichhavi. He married off his daughter Bhrikuti to the famous Tibetan King Tsong Tsen Gampo thus establishing good relations with Tibet. The Lichhavis brought art and architecture to the valley but the golden age of creativity arrived in 1200 A.D with the Mallas.

During their 550 year rule, the Mallas built numerous temples and splendid palaces with picturesque squares. It was also during their rule that society and the cities became well organized; religious festivals were introduced and literature, music and art were encouraged. 

After the death of Yaksha Malla, the valley was divided into three kingdoms: Kathmandu (Kantipur), Bhaktapur (Bhadgaon) and Patan (Lalitpur). Around this time, the Nepal as we know it today was divided into about 46 independent principalities. One among these was the kingdom of Gorkha with a Shah ruler. Much of Kathmandu Valley’s history around this time was recorded by Capuchin friars who lived in the valley on their way in and out of Tibet.

An ambitious Gorkha King named Prithvi Narayan Shah embarked on a conquering mission that led to the defeat of all the kingdoms in the valley (including Kirtipur which was an independent state) by 1769. Instead of annexing the newly acquired states to his kingdom of Gorkha, Prithvi Narayan decided to move his capital to Kathmandu establishing the Shah dynasty which ruled unified Nepal from 1769 to 2008.

The history of the Gorkha state goes back to 1559 when Dravya Shah established a kingdom in an area chiefly inhabited by Magars. During the 17th and early 18th centuries, Gorkha continued a slow expansion, conquering various states while forging alliances with others. 

Prithvi Narayan dedicated himself at an early age to the conquest of the Kathmandu Valley. Recognizing the threat of the British Raj in India, he dismissed European missionaries from the country and for more than a century, Nepal remained in isolation.

During the mid-19th Century Jung Bahadur Rana became Nepal’s first prime minister to wield absolute power relegating the Shah king to mere figureheads. He started a hereditary reign of the Rana Prime Ministers that lasted for 104 years. The Ranas were overthrown in a democracy movement of the early 1950s with support from the-then monarch of Nepal, King Tribhuvan. 

Soon after the overthrow of the Ranas, King Tribhuvan was reinstated as the Head of the State. In early 1959, Tribhuvan’s son King Mahendra issued a new constitution, and the first democratic elections for a national assembly were held. 

The Nepali Congress Party was victorious and their leader, Bishweshwar Prasad Koirala formed a government and served as prime minister. But by 1960, King Mahendra had changed his mind and dissolved Parliament, dismissing the first democratic government.

After many years of struggle when the political parties were banned, they finally mustered enough courage to start a People’s Movement in 1990. Paving way for democracy, the then-King Birendra accepted constitutional reforms and established a multiparty parliament with King as the Head of State and an executive Prime Minister. 

In May 1991, Nepal held its first parliamentary elections. In February 1996, the Maoist parties declared People’s War against monarchy and the elected government.

Then on 1st June 2001, a horrific tragedy wiped out the entire royal family including King Birendra and Queen Aishwarya with many of their closest relatives. With only King Birendra’s brother, Gyanendra and his family surviving, he was crowned the king. King Gyanendra abided by the elected government for some time and then dismissed the elected Parliament to wield absolute power. 

In April 2006, another People’s Movement was launched jointly by the democratic parties focusing most energy in Kathmandu which led to a 19-day curfew. Eventually, King Gyanendra relinquished his power and reinstated the Parliament. 

On November 21, 2006, Prime Minister Girija Prasad Koirala and Maoist chairman Prachanda signed the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) 2006, committing to democracy and peace for the progress of the country and people. A Constituent Assembly election was held on April 10, 2008. 

On May 28,2008, the newly elected Constituent Assembly declared Nepal a Federal Democratic Republic, abolishing the 240 year-old monarchy. Nepal today has a President as Head of State and a Prime Minister heading the Government.

Geography of Nepal 
Nepal is located in South Asia between China in the north and India in the south, east and west. While the total land area is 147,181 sq. km including water area of the country that is 3,830 sq. km. The geographical coordinates are 28°00′N 84°00′E. Nepal falls in the temperate zone north of the Tropic of Cancer.

Nepal’s ecological zones run east to west about 800 km along its Himalayan axis, 150 to 250 km north to south, and is vertically intersected by the river systems. The country can be divided into three main geographical regions: Himalayan region, mid hill region and Terai region. The highest point in the country is Mt. Everest (8,848 m) while the lowest point is in the Terai plains of Kechana Kalan in Jhapa (60 m).

The Terai region, with width of ranging 26 to 32 km and altitude ranging from 60 -305 m, occupies about 17 percent of total land area of the country. Kechana Kalan, the lowest point of the country with an altitude of 60 m, lies in Jhapa district of the eastern Terai.

The southern lowland Terai continues to the Bhabar belt covered with the Char Kose Jhadi forests known for rich wildlife. Further north, the Siwalik zone (700 – 1,500 m) and the Mahabharat range (1,500 – 2,700 m) give way to the Duns (valleys), such as Trijuga, Sindhuli, Chitwan, Dang and Surkhet. 

The Midlands (600 – 3,500 m), north of the Mahabharat range is where the two beautiful valleys of Kathmandu and Pokhara lie covered in terraced rice fields, and surrounded by forested watersheds.

The Himalayas (above 3,000 m) comprises mountains, alpine pastures and temperate forests limited by the tree-line (4,000 m) and snow line (5,500 m). Eight of the 14 eight-thousanders of the world lie in Nepal: Sagarmatha or Mount Everest (8,848 m), Kanchenjunga (8,586 m), Lhotse (8,516 m), Makalu (8,463 m), Cho Oyu (8,201m), Dhaulagiri (8,167 m), Manaslu (8,163 m) and Annapurna (8,091 m). 

The inner Himalayan valley (above 3,600 m) such as Mustang and Dolpa are cold deserts sharing topographical characteristics with the Tibetan plateau.Nepal holds the so called “waters towers of South Asia” with its 6,000 rivers which are snow-fed or dependent on rain. 

The perennial rivers include Mahakali, Karnali, Narayani and Koshi rivers originating in the Himalayas. Medium-sized rivers like Babai, West Rapti, Bagmati, Kamla, Kankai and Mechi originate in the Midlands and Mahabharat range. A large number of seasonal streams, mostly originating in Siwaliks, flow across the Terai.

Of 163 wetlands documented, the nine globally recognized Ramsar sites are: Koshi Tappu Wildlife Reserve, Beeshazarital (Chitwan), Jagdishpur Reservoir (Kapilvastu) Ghodaghodi Tal (Kailali) in the Terai, and Gokyo (Solukhumbu), Phoksundo (Dolpa), Rara (Mugu) and Mai Pokhari (Ilam) in the mountain region.There are more than 30 natural caves in the country out of which only a few are accessible by road. 

Maratika Cave (also known as Haleshi) is a pilgrimage site associated with Buddhism and Hinduism. Siddha Cave is near Bimalnagar along the Kathmandu-Pokhara highway. Pokhara is also known for caves namely Bats’ shed, Batulechar, Gupteswar, Patale Chhango. The numerous caves around Lo Manthang in Mustang include Luri and Tashi Kabum which house ancient murals and chhortens dating back to the 13th century.

CLIMATE OF NEPAL
Climatic conditions of Nepal vary from one place to another in accordance with their geographical features. In the north summers are cool and winters severe, while in the south summers are tropical and winters are mild. Nepal has five seasons: spring, summer, monsoon, autumn and winter.

In the Terai (south Nepal), summer temperatures exceed 37° C and higher in some areas, winter temperatures range from 7°C to 23°C in the Terai. In mountainous regions, hills and valleys, summers are temperate while winter temperatures can plummet under sub zero. The Kathmandu Valley has a pleasant climate with average summer and winter temperatures of 19°C – 35°C and 2°C – 12°C respectively.

Good to know is that on average temperatures drop 6°C for every 1,000 m you gain in altitude.

The Himalayas act as a barrier to the cold winds blowing from Central Asia in winter, and forms the northern boundary of the monsoon wind patterns. Eighty percent of all the rain in Nepal is received during the monsoon (June-September). Winter rains are more pronounced in the western hills. The average annual rainfall is 1,600 mm, but it varies by eco-climatic zones, such as 3,345 mm in Pokhara and below 300 mm in Mustang.

There is no seasonal constraint on traveling in and through Nepal. Even in December and January, when winter is at its severest, there are compensating bright sun and brilliant views. As with most of the trekking areas in Nepal, the best time to visit are during spring and autumn. Spring is the time for rhododendrons while the clearest skies are found after the monsoon in October and November. However, Nepal can be visited the whole year round.

Average temperatures and rainfall during peak summer and winter in three most popular tourist areas:
  Place                          Summer (May, June, July)           Winter (Dec, Jan, Feb)
                              Max (°C)  Min (°C)  Rain (mm)       Max (°C)    Min (°C)    Rain (mm)  
  Kathmandu                   28.1   19.5       312                  19.3        3.0           15.4
  Pokhara                       29.7    21.3      829.7                20.3        7.7           26.3
  Chitwan                       33.0    25.3      404.0                24.1        8.3          13.8

For more information about Nepal’s climatic conditions, please visit the official web site of the Department of Hydrology & Meteorology, Ministry of Environment.

Culture of Nepal
Customs and traditions differ from one part of Nepal to another. A conglomeration lies in capital city Kathmandu where cultures are blending to form a national identity. Kathmandu Valley has served as the country’s cultural metropolis since the unification of Nepal in the 18th Century. 

A prominent factor in a Nepali’s everyday life is religion. Adding color to the lives of Nepalis are festivals the year round which they celebrate with much pomp and joy. Food plays an important role in the celebration of these festivals. 

Religion:
Nepal was declared a secular country by the Parliament on May 18, 2006. Religions practiced in Nepal are: Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam, Christianity, Jainism, Sikhism, Bon, ancestor worship and animism. The majority of Nepalis are either Hindus or Buddhism. The two have co-existed in harmony through centuries.

Buddha is widely worshiped by both Buddhists and Hindus of Nepal. The five Dhyani Buddhas; Vairochana, Akshobhaya, Rathasambhava, Amitabha and Amoghasiddhi, represent the five basic elements: earth, fire, water, air and ether. Buddhist philosophy conceives these deities to be the manifestations of Sunya or absolute void. Mahakaala and Bajrayogini are Vajrayana Buddhist deities worshiped by Hindus as well.

Hindu Nepalis worship the ancient Vedic gods. Bramha the Creator, Vishnu the Preserver and Shiva the Destroyer, are worshipped as the Supreme Hindu Trinity. People pray to the Shiva Linga or the phallic symbol of Lord Shiva in most Shiva temples. Shakti, the dynamic element in the female counterpart of Shiva, is highly revered and feared.

Mahadevi, Mahakali, Bhagabati, Ishwari are some of the names given. Kumari, the Virgin Goddess, also represents Shakti.Other popular deities are Ganesh for luck, Saraswati for knowledge, Lakshmi for wealth and Hanuman for protection. 

Krishna, believed to be the human incarnation of Lord Vishnu is also worshipped widely. Hindu holy scripts Bhagawat Gita, Ramayan and Mahabharat are widely read in Nepal. Vedas, Upanishads and other holy scriptures are read by well learned Brahmin Pundits during special occasions.

Customs:
The diversity in Nepal in terms of ethnicity again makes room for various sets of customs. Most of these customs go back to the Hindu, Buddhist or other religious traditions. Among them, the rules of marriage are particularly interesting. Traditional marriages call for deals arranged by parents after the boy or girl come of age.

Nepalese do not eat beef. There are several reasons for this, one being that the Hindus worship cow. Cow is also the national animal of Nepal. Another interesting concept among Nepalese  is division of pure and impure. “Jutho” referring to food or material touched by another’s mouth directly or indirectly, is considered impure by Nepalese. 

Nepalese  consider cow dung to be pure for cleansing purposes. During menstruation women are considered impure and hence, are kept in seclusion until their fourth day purification bath. Nepal is a patriarchal society. Men usually go out to work while women are homemakers. However, in cities, roles can differ. 

Most Nepalese abide by the caste system in living habits and marriage. Rural Nepal is mostly agrarian, while some aspects of urban life carry glitz and glamour of the ultra-modern world.

Food:
Nepal does not have a distinct cooking style. However, food habits differ depending on the region. Nepali food has been influenced by Indian and Tibetan styles of cooking. Authentic Nepali taste is found in Newari and Thakai cuisines. Most Nepalis do not use cutlery but eat with their right hand.

The regular Nepali meal is dal (lentil soup), bhat (boiled rice) and tarkari (curried vegetables), often accompanied by achar (pickle). Curried meat is very popular, but is saved for special occasions, as it is relatively more expensive. 

Momos (steamed or fried dumplings) deserve a mention as one of the most popular snack among Nepalis. Rotis (flat bread) and dhedo (boiled flour) also make meals in some homes.

Festival:
Nepal is distinctly known as the world of colorful vibrant festivals. Most of the festivals celebrated in Nepal have religious connotation and some are based on important events from ancient mythology and epic literature. Nepalese have diverse beliefs and ethnic backgrounds. 

Despite these facts, all unite in the celebration of the year’s major festivals. Festivals such as Dashain and Tihar are of national significance; such as Bisket Jatra or Rato Machchhendranath Jatra, belong to the traditions of the old Valley towns and still others, such as Chait, are observed only by a particular ethnic community.

The vivid cultural diversity of Nepal can be observed in the difference of different festival celebrations. Here are depicted the 10 major festivals in Nepal.

Dashain and Tihar
The biggest and most popular festivals based on religion are: Dashain and Tihar in Nepal. Dashain, a celebration of Goddess Durga’s victory over evil Mahisashur, has symbolic meaning deeply rooted in Nepalese society. Tihar, a celebration of lights and color dedicated to Goddess Laxmi, too unfolds social joy throughout the nation.

Buddha Jayanti
Buddha Jayanti is celebrated to mark the birthday of the Lord Buddha which dates back in about 543 BC. It falls on the full moon night of either May or June. The peace lover and Buddhist communities like to make their pilgrimage at Buddha’s birth place Lumbini of Nepal in this auspicious day.

Gai Jatra
Gai Jatra is one of the most popular festivals generally celebrated in between August-September. Even though Gai Jatra has presence throughout the country, it has most strongholds in the Newari community of Kathmandu valley. This festival has its roots in the belief that the god of death, Yamaraj, must be feared and hence worshiped.

Janai Purnima
Janai Purnima keeps the sacred meaning in Hindu community of Nepal. On this same day Rakshya Bandhan is also celebrated where every Hindu ties a sacred thread. Janai Purnima maintains the holy significance where as Rakshya Bandhan makes stronger the love and respect in between and among sisters and brothers.

Teej
Teej is a celebration of fasting in which women pray for marital bliss, well being of their spouse and children and purification of their own body and soul. It takes place on August and September. In the present context, the festival has connotation with rights of women.

Shree Krishna Janmastami
Shree Krishna Janmastami marks the celebration of the birth of Lord Sri Krishna. Lord Krishnais regarded as the 8th avatar or ‘incarnation’ of Lord Vishnu. It falls on August and September. This festival is hugely celebrated throughout the country.

Fagun Purnima
Fagun Purnima, allegedly named after the mythical demoness Holika, is a day when the feast of colors is celebrated. The ancient Holi festival falls on late February or on early March. It has growing popularity among Nepalese even today and it is amazingly celebrated throughout the nation.

Maghe Sankranti
Maghe Sankranti is the harbinger of the holy month usually in the mid of January. The festival hopes to bring end of cold season and expect to coming of warmer weather and better days of health and fortune.

Indrajatra
Indrajatra falls in August and September. Both Hindus and Buddhists unite to celebrate the festival with great enthusiasm. Indrajatra has historic significance in Nepal as well.

Mahashivaratri
Mahashivaratri is the celebration dedicated to the Lord Shiva which falls in February and March. It is the celebration of birthday of supreme god of Hindu mythological figure. Thousands and thousands of visitors make their pilgrimage visit in Kathmandu on this day.

Apart from these festivals, Nepal celebrates more and more other regional, communal and seasonal festivals. Visit to Nepal, no matter which time of the year, promises a rewarding festive experience.

People in Nepal
The population of Nepal was recorded to be about 26.62 million according to a recent survey done by the Central Bureau of Statistics, Nepal.  The population comprises of about a 101 ethnic groups speaking over 92 languages. The distinction in caste and ethnicity is understood more easily with a view of customary layout of the population. 

Though, there exist numerous dialects, the language of unification is the national language, Nepali. Nepali is the official language of the state, spoken and understood by majority of the population. Multiple ethnic groups have their own mother tongues. English is spoken by many in Government and business offices. It is the mode of education in most private schools of Kathmandu and some other cities.

Northern Himalayan People:
In the northern region of the Himalayas are the Tibetan-speaking groups namely Sherpas, Dolpa-pas, Lopas, Baragaonlis, Manangis. The Sherpas are mainly found in the east, Solu and Khumbu region; the Baragaonlis and Lopas live in the semi-deserted areas of Upper and Lower Mustang in the Tibetan rain-shadow area; the Manangis live in Manang district area; while the Dolpa-pas live in Dolpa district of west Nepal.

Middle Hills and Valley People:
Several ethnic groups live in the middle hills and valleys. Among them are the Magars, Gurungs, Tamangs, Sunuwars, Newars, Thakalis, Chepangs, Brahmins, Chhetris and Thakuris. There are also occupational castes namely: Damai (tailor), Sarki (cobbler), Kami (blacksmith) and Sunar (goldsmiths).

Ethnic Diversity in the Kathmandu Valley:
Kathmandu Valley represents a cultural cauldron of the country, where, people from varied backgrounds have come together to present a melting pot. The natives of the Kathmandu Valley are the Newars. Newari culture is an integration of both Hinduism and Buddhism. The Newars of Kathmandu Valley were traders or farmers by occupation in the old days.

Terai People:
The main ethnic groups in Terai are Tharus, Darai, Kumhal, Majhi and other groups. They speak north Indian dialects like Maithili, Bhojpuri. Owing to the fertile plains of Terai, most inhabitants live on agriculture. There are, however, some occupational castes like Majhi (fisherman), Kumhal (potter) and Danuwar (cart driver).

For more information about Nepali people,
Please visit: http://census.gov.np
(official web site of the Central Bureau of Statistics).

WILDLIFE IN NEPAL
Of the total number of species found globally, 3.96 percent mammals, 3.72 percent butterflies and 8.9 percent of birds. Wildlife of Nepal is officially classified into two main categories: common and protected. 

The common category lists such species as common leopard, spotted deer, Himalayan tahr, blue sheep and others. These species are commonly seen in the wild. The protected species include 26 mammals, nine birds and three reptiles. These rare animals are confined to their prime habitats.

Please click Protected Species for details.
The endemic fauna are: Himalayan field mouse, spiny babbler, Nepali kalij, 14 herpetofauna, and six types of fishes.

Mammals:
Nepal has 185 species of mammals found in various parts of the country. Found in Nepal’s dense Terai jungles are exotic animals like the Asiatic elephant, the one-horned rhinoceros, the Royal Bengal tiger among others. 

Also found here are the leopard, monkey, langur, hyena, jackal, wild boar, antelope, wild cat, wolf, sloth bear, chital or spotted deer and barking deer. Wild buffalo locally called “Arna” is found in the Koshi Tappu region. 

The western Terai jungles of Suklaphanta is home of the of swamp deer, while the endangered blackbucks are found in the Bardia region. Nepal Government has made an effort to preserve blackbucks by declaring an area of 15.95 sq. km. in Bardia as Blackbuck Conservation Area.

Nepal even has its own variety of dolphins found in the fresh waters of Narayani and Karnali rivers. The Himalayan region is also home to the elusive snow leopard and the red panda. Red panda, a rare sight because of its shy nature, may be found from Langtang region to Kanchenjunga region. 

Other mammals that live in high altitude areas are yak, blue sheep, Himalayan tahr and musk deer.  While otters are found in the Rara region north west, the Dhorpatan hunting grounds is home of the blue sheep and Himalayan tahr.

Reptiles:
Nepal has two indigenous species of crocodile: the fish eating gharial with the long narrow snout and the marsh mugger which is omnivorous, eating anything it can catch. A very successful breeding project has brought the gharial back from extinction. 

Some of the snakes found in Nepal are: cobras, kraits, vipers and the Indian python. Other reptiles found in the country are turtles and monitor lizards. Some of these reptiles can be seen in the Chitwan National Park and Bardia National Park.

Birds:
Nepal has more than 850 recorded species of birds. Amazingly, half of these birds can be seen in and around the Kathmandu valley alone. The hills around the valley especially Nagarjun, Godavari and Phulchowki are popular birding areas. Phulchowki at 2,760 m boasts about 90 bird species including the endemic spiny babbler, which was thought to be extinct until it was spotted in Nepal. Another rare species of bird, the red-headed trogan, was also sighted here in April 2000.

National parks like Chitwan and Bardia harbor a wide variety of birds too. In Chitwan, endangered vultures are being protected from contaminated food by establishing “Vulture Restaurant” which feeds them safe carcasses. The Koshi Tappu region is home to a large species of resident and migratory birds. 

It has about 26 varieties of ducks alone. About 485 species have been sighted here, including black ibis, honey kites, ospreys, black headed orioles, peregrine falcon, partridges, ruddy shelduck, storks, vultures and eagles among others.In the higher Himalayan region are found different species of the raptors and birds of prey. Nepal’s national bird, the Danphe or impeyen pheasant, is also found in the Himalayan region. 

A rare bird known as jerdon’s baza was sighted in Nepal. Over the past few years a conservation group has worked specifically in the Lumbini area to conserve the sarus crane.

For more information about Nepal’s wildlife,
Please visit: dnpwc.gov.np
(official web site of the Department of National Parks & Wildlife Conservation, Ministry of Forests & Soil Conservation).

Plants
Of the total number of species found globally, Nepal possesses 2.80 percent plants. Record from 2006 shows that Nepal has 6,391 flowering plant species, representing 1,590 genera and 231 families. Nepal’s share of flowering plant species is 2.76 percent of the global total compared to earlier records of 2.36 percent. Nepal’s share of pteriodophytes is 5.15 percent compared to earlier records of 4.45 percent. 

There are 2,532 species of vascular plants represented by 1,034 genera and 199 families in the protected sites. Some 130 endemic species are found in the protected sites.

For ecology and vegetation purpose Nepal could be divided into four floristic regions i.e.
(a) western
(b) north-western
(c) central, and
(d) eastern, and bio-climatically these are broken down into twenty regions from humid tropical climate to the arid, alpine regions.

There are 399 endemic flowering plants in Nepal of which about 63 percent are from the high mountains, 38 percent from the mid hills, and only 5 percent from the Terai and Siwaliks. Similarly, the central region contains 66 percent of the total endemic species followed by 32 percent in the western and 29 percent in the eastern regions.

Medicinal Plants:
The Himalayas are famous for medicinal plants and have even been mentioned in the Aurveda. Many of the herbs and plants found in the Himlayas are used in traditional healing systems like Ayurvedic, Homoeopathic, Amchi etc. 

Some of these plants are even used for allopathic medicine. Medicinal plants are abundantly found in: the Terai region of Nawalparasi, Chitwan, Bardia, Dhanusha, mid hill region of Makhwanpur, Syangja, Kaski, Lamgjung, Dolakha, Parvat, Ilam, Ramechhap, Nuwakot, and the Himalayan region of Dolpa, Mugu, Humla, Jumla, Manang, Mustang and Solukhumbu.

Orchids:
In ancient Rome, Theophrastus, a student of Plato, was intrigued by the sight of a plant with a pair of roots. Orchis was the name he gave them, the Greek word for testicles. Worldwide, there are some 500 to 600 genera and some 20,000 to 35,000 names, the largest of all plant families, and out of this, 

Nepal has 57 genera (27 Terrestrials and 30 Epiphytic) with a few Lithophytes.Nepal is endowed with an incredible variety of orchids scattered across the country. Dedrobium is the largest species, followed by Habenaria and Bulbophyllum. Anthogonium, Hemipilia and Lusia are some of the other varieties amongst the nearly two dozen single species families.

For more information about Nepal’s plant resources,
Visit: dpr.gov.np
(official web site of the Department of Plant Resources, Ministry of Forests & Soil Conservation).

VISA INFORMATION NEPAL
A visa for Nepal can be obtained on arrival at the Tribhuvan International Airport, Kathmandu and at border entry points in Kakadvitta, Birgunj, Bhairahawa, Nepalgunj, Gaddachowki on the Nepal-India border and Kodari on the Nepal-China border.

Outside of Nepal, A visa can also be obtained at the nearest Nepal Embassy or Diplomatic Mission.
To renew a Visa you can go to the Department of Immigration, Kalikasthan, Kathmandu.

VISA REQUIREMENTS
A valid passport and one passport -size photo with a light background.
Visa can be obtained only through payment of cash in the following currency: Euro, Swiss Franc, Pound Sterling, US Dollar, Australian Dollar, Canadian Dollar, Hong Kong Dollar, Singapore Dollar and Japanese Yen.
Credit card, Indian currency and Nepali currency are not accepted as payment of visa fee

a. Tourist Visa Nepal
Visa Facility         Duration              Fee
Multiple entry       15 days       US$ 25 or equivalent convertible currency
Multiple entry       30 days       US$ 40 or equivalent convertible currency
Multiple entry       90 days       US$ 100 or equivalent convertible currency

b. Gratis (Free) Visa
• For first visit in one visa year (January to December) , gratis visa for 30 days is available only for nationals of South Asian countries like Bangladesh, Bhutan, Maldives, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. However, visa can be extended from the Immigration Department on payment of  visa fee as specified above.

• Indian nationals do not require visa to enter into Nepal.

c. Nepal Visa For Indian Nationals
Indian nationals do not require a visa to enter Nepal. As per the Nepalese Immigration, Indian Nationals Traveling to Nepal must possess any One of the following documents.
1. Passport
2. Driving License with photo
3. Photo Identity card issued by a Government Agency
4. Ration Card with Photo
5. Election Commission Card with Photo
6. Identity Card issued by Embassy of India in Kathmandu
7. Identity Card with Photo issued by Sub- Divisional Magistrate or any other officials above his rank
Also, please check with your nearest travel agents for documents required by the Indian Immigration for Indians traveling to Nepal

d. Nepal Visa For Chinese Nationals
As per official circular of the Embassy of Nepal in Beijing, China, Chinese nationals applying for tourist visa to Nepal are being provided “gratis tourist visa” from Jan. 5, 2016, from following Nepali missions in the People’s Republic of China:
1. Embassy of Nepal, Beijing
2. Consulate General of Nepal, Lhasa
3. Consulate General of Nepal, Hong Kong
4. Honorary Consulate of Nepal, Shanghai

e. Other Visa Information
Nationals from Nigeria, Ghana, Zimbabwe, Swaziland, Cameroon, Somalia, Liberia, Ethiopia, Iraq, Palestine and Afghanistan will need to obtain visa from Nepal Embassies or Diplomatic Missions in their respective countries, as they do not get visa on arrival at the immigration entry points of Nepal.

f. Visa Extension for Nepal
Tourists can stay for a maximum of 150 days in a visa year (Jan 1 to Dec 31).
Learn more about applying for Nepal visa online by clicking here Online Visa Application for Nepal.
For further visa information for Nepal, please contact: Department of Immigration Kalikasthan, Kathmandu
Tel: 00977-1- 4429660 / 4438862 / 4438868/ 4433934
E-mail: mail@nepalimmigration.gov.np,  dg@nepalimmigration.gov.np 

How to get in Nepal
Nepal is a popular tourist destination in south Asia. Several airlines have direct and non-stop flights from Middle East and Asia to Tribhuvan International Airport (TIA), Kathmandu, Which is only one international airport in Nepal.

There are direct flights from Delhi, Hongkong, Singapore, Bangkok, Kulalmpur, Karachi, Bombay, Lhasa, Vanarasi, Doha, Abudhabi, Baharain, Sharja, Dubai, Seoul, Paro, Dhaka, Calcutta and you may flight with transit with many Airlines company who operate Dally flight to Nepal Via Transit Point. so there is just two way to access in Nepal

By Air:
• The Tribhuvan airport in Kathmandu is Nepal’s only international airport to access.
By Road:
• There are just eight entry points into Nepal by land open to foreigners, from which six are from India and two from Tibet.

Flight connection to Nepal:
Nepal is linked with outside world by several international airlines. Countries in Pacific rim and west coast of America including Latin America are connected by major international airlines by flight that stops at Bangkok , Singapore and Hongkong. Airlines add and reschedule their flight or sometime discontinue their service due to the unforeseen conditions that continually develops.

Name of Airlines Company Who operate flight in Nepal Direct via Transit Point:
• Nepal Airlines
• Singapore Air/Silk Air
• Dragon Air/ Cathay Pacific
• Indian Air/ Air India
• Jet Airways/Jet Light
• Korean Air

• China Air/Air China

• China Southern/China East
• Gulf Air/ Air Bahrain
• Air Dubai
• Qatar Airways
• Thai Airways
• Druk Air
• Biman Bangladesh/ GMG Airlines
• Pakistan Airlines

Bellow Airways Company Operate flight in Nepal with Connecting Flight:
• Austrian Air/ Royal Dutch Airways
• British Airways/ Lufthansa Air
• United Air/North West Airlines
• Kuwait Airways/ Malaysia Airlines
• Qantas Air/ Air France
• Emirates/Delta Airlines
• Eva Air/Japan Airlines

Overland route to Nepal:
Train and road network in India can be used to travel from north India to Nepal. In the east Kakarbhitta, across Silguri and Darjeeling of West Bengal and in the center Bhairawa ( Lumbini ) provides easy access to enter Nepal. 

Bhairawa entry-exit point provides suitable train and bus connections to Varanasi, Bodgaya, Patna and Agra. In Far West Nepal the entry point is Mahendranagar. It can be reached by road from Delhi. There are good network of road and train in India. Most recently Dacca in Bangladesh has also open up overland route to Nepal for tourist

Entry Point of Nepal:
• Tribhuvan International Airport, Kathmandu
• Kakarvitta, Jhapa (Eastern Nepal)
• Birganj, Parsa (Central Nepal)
• Kodari, Sindhupalchowk (Northern Border)
• Belhiya, Bhairahawa (Rupandehi, Western Nepal)
•  Jamuna, Nepalgunj (Banke, Mid Western Nepal)
• Mohana, Dhangadhi (Kailali, Far Western Nepal)
• Gaddachauki, Mahendranagar (Kanchanpur, Far Western Nepal)


Contact: 
Chhetup Tamang
Managing Director
P.O.Box: 20114 Kathmandu,Nepal
Landline Telephone:+ 97714006665
Mobile:+9779851054734 (24 Hours)
Email: info@treknepal.travel
---------------------------------------------------
"SPECIALIST IN NEPAL, BHUTAN & TIBET"
---------------------------------------------------

About ""

WazzupPilipinas.com is the fastest growing and most awarded blog and social media community that has transcended beyond online media. It has successfully collaborated with all forms of media namely print, radio and television making it the most diverse multimedia organization. The numerous collaborations with hundreds of brands and organizations as online media partner and brand ambassador makes WazzupPilipinas.com a truly successful advocate of everything about the Philippines, and even more since its support extends further to even international organizations including startups and SMEs that have made our country their second home.

Post a Comment

 
Copyright © 2013 Wazzup Pilipinas News and Events
Design by FBTemplates | BTT